Conservation

Report Series: Life in the Heart of the Arctic

A journey through the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

The Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the heart of America’s Arctic. Glacial rivers create the arteries that run from the rugged peaks of the Brooks Range, to the rich coastal nurseries of the Beaufort Sea. Birds and mammals travel the world’s longest migration distances to return each year for protection. Even under winter’s quiet rest, the coastal plain remains a heartbeat of life in the Arctic, as water flows from perennial springs, musk oxen seek food on windswept plains, and polar bears rest deep in the drifts, birth their young, and wait for the bounty of spring. 

Audubon Alaska synthesizes science to share the stories of the Refuge and highlight the value of its Coastal Plain not just for wildlife, but for all of us. This series of reports will be published over the next six months.  

Reports

Fish in the Heart of the Arctic
Conservation

Fish in the Heart of the Arctic

The rivers, lakes, and coastal waters of the Arctic Refuge are alive with an abundance of fish.

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Migratory Birds in the Heart of the Arctic
Conservation

Migratory Birds in the Heart of the Arctic

Birds from all over the world travel to the Arctic Refuge each year. Read their stories.

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Nesting Birds in the Heart of the Arctic
Conservation

Nesting Birds in the Heart of the Arctic

Each year, many birds come to the Arctic Refuge to breed and raise their chicks. Read their stories.

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